Beijing Closes Cash Spigot

China is now a less hospitable destination, at least for certain dealmakers. Ernst & Young estimates that Chinese outbound investment is set to reach $100 billion in 2017, representing a sharp decline from the $183 billion seen last year. Beijing blames this decline in part on growing hostility toward Chinese firms in the US and Europe. There is some truth to that point. The bigger issue is that officials are resolved to mitigate the volume of leveraged deals and address attendant imbalances in the domestic economy. Earlier this month, regulators outlined new rules on outbound investment. They specifically targeted excesses in property, film, entertainment, and sports, while advocated investment in infrastructure, oil and mining, agriculture, and technology. This policy clarification streamlines the deal-making process in favor of traditional industries, if not lower risk alternatives. But the macroeconomic context suggests that Chinese investors are likely to move forward at a far more measured pace than in the past.

Our Vantage Point: China remains a dominant player in cross-border investments worldwide. But the integrity of the domestic finance sector is a primary concern, given the muted outlook for economic growth.

Learn more at the Nikkei Asian Review.

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Image: Investment in Macau-based companies has raised the ire of Chinese officials. Credit: Vichie81 at Can Stock Photo Inc.